The Visitor’s Guide to Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Homesites Part 1

Laura traveled to many different places throughout her life. Her father, Charles Ingalls, had a deep desire to keep moving west. He wanted wide open spaces that were unsettled and untouched. Now, museums sit where Laura lived in order to preserve her lasting legacy. Thousands of people travel to each one, eager to learn more about the famous author’s life. Listed below are Laura’s home sites that are open for visitors!

Pepin, Wisconsin

Pepin 2

Pepin  Museum

Laura Elizabeth Ingalls was born in Pepin, Wisconsin on February 7, 1867. Laura talked about this part of her life in Little House in the Big Woods. She lived there a combined total of about 5 years, leaving the state permanently in 1874 when Charles Ingalls moved his family to Walnut Grove.

The Pepin Museum is open for visitors from 10am- 5pm daily from mid-May to mid-October. There, you can browse their gift shop that’s filled with Laura souvenirs, see displays about the Ingalls family, and learn more about the early life of the famous author. While here, make a stop to the Little House wayside cabin. Situated on three acres of Charles Ingalls’ original land, this replica cabin is modeled after Laura’s home in Little House in the Big Woods. During September, Pepin holds the Laura Ingalls Wilder Days Festival. Visitors can see antiques, a craft fair, parade, a Laura look-alike pageant, and a play based on Laura’s time in Pepin. One last stop to make is to Lake Pepin, where Laura and her family visited. Start planning your trip to Pepin today!

Click here to visit the Pepin Museum’s website!

Pepin 1

Replica of Laura’s first home

Montgomery County, Kansas

Kansas 1

Replica of Laura’s home

Charles Ingalls moved his family to Montgomery County, Kansas during 1869-1870. He wanted to leave the crowded woods of Wisconsin behind and have a fresh start on the wide open prairie. The family was in Kansas for about 1 year before returning to their home in Pepin. During that time, Caroline “Carrie” Celestia Ingalls was born on August 3, 1870.

The land that the Ingalls settled on was found by Margaret Clement and Eilene Charbo. It is now owned by a family, but is still open for fans to come and see. A one room log cabin was built to model the home that Laura described in Little House on the Prairie . A hand dug well was also found and could possibly be the one that Charles Ingalls dug himself. The land surrounding the replica cabin is still wide open prairie, which gives visitors a sense of what Laura saw everyday and how vast the land was. While visiting, you can also check out the Wayside Post Office, built in 1885 and the Sunnyside Schoolhouse, built in 1871. Both are now located near the replica cabin on the original land. The Kansas Museum is open during the summer and early fall months. Check out their website for exact details!

Click here to visit the Kansas Museum’s website!

Walnut Grove, Minnesota

Walnut Grove 1 (2)

Walnut Grove Museum

In 1874, Charles packed up his family once again and moved them to Walnut Grove, Minnesota. They first lived in a dugout on the banks of Plum Creek before Charles built a brand new house. The family lived in Walnut Grove for a combined total of 4-5 years, living in Burr Oak, Iowa for a year in between. Laura wrote about her time in Minnesota in On the Banks of Plum Creek.

The first stop you should make in Walnut Grove is to the Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum. There, you can browse the gift shop that has books, clothes, and souvenirs. You can also take a self guided tour through a complex of buildings including a depot, a schoolhouse, a “little” chapel, and “Grandma’s house”, which was built sometime in the 1890s. You will see different exhibits about Laura, her family, and what life was like back then. Stop by the T.V. show room and snap a picture with the fire mantle that belonged to Laura’s home on Little House on the Prairie. The gift shop is open year round, but the museum is open in the summer and early fall months. Check out the website for exact details!

One and a half miles north of Walnut Grove, visitors can visit the site of the dugout and Plum Creek. The original homestead land that belonged to Charles Ingalls is now owned by another family. When they found out it was once Laura’s home, they opened up Plum Creek for visitors. Native prairie grasses were planted so fans could see what it was like when Laura lived there, walking trails were made, and a picnic area was put in. Fans can wade in Plum Creek just like Laura did. The original dugout the family lived in caved in many years ago, but the site is marked. Plum Creek is open during daylight hours from May to October.

Click here to visit the Walnut Grove Museum’s website. Check out other things to do while in town!

Walnut Grove 2

Plum Creek

Burr Oak, Iowa

Masters Hotel Today

The Master’s Hotel today

After two consecutive years of failed crops in Walnut Grove, Charles Ingalls moved his family to Burr Oak, Iowa. The Steadmans, a family the Ingalls met through church, had just purchased the Master’s Hotel in Burr Oak and wanted Charles and his family to help them run it. The Ingalls only stayed in Iowa for 1 year, from the fall of 1876-1877. Laura chose to leave this part of her life out of her books, saying it would disrupt her theme of the family always moving west.

Stop by the Laura Ingalls Wilder Park & Museum, which is housed in the restored 1910 Burr Oak Savings Bank, and sign up for the guided tour. Your tour guide will lead you through the Master’s Hotel right across the street and talk about Laura’s time there, including stories and details she left out of her books. The museum also has a gift shop and the original bank vault that you can explore. Learn more  information about the history and restoration process of the building.

The town has “Laura Days” that takes place every 4th weekend in June. Activities include a parade, games, crafts, food, contests, and a 5K run. The Museum is open for visitors May through October. Check out their website for exact details!

Click here to visit the Burr Oak Museum’s website!

Stayed tuned for Part 2 of the Visitor’s Guide to see more places you can visit!

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